Make it Clap

May 22nd, 2015

cheeky nandos

Turn up your speakers! Customer teethoflions posted this entertaining video of his HR-OS1 being cheeky. What song will your robot dance to?

A video posted by Matt McNair (@teethoflions) on

OVPiPod

May 20th, 2015

ovpipod

Want to control your Trossen Robotics PhantomX Hexapod with an iPod/iPad? User reneca has done just that. There seems to be a bit of lag on their camera, but the controls look spot-on. The project files are available on GitHub if you’re looking to try it out for yourself!

Real Robots Live is looking for input.

May 18th, 2015

Real Robots Live

Real Robots Live is a project in its infancy, looking for input before launching their crowdfunding campaign. It would be awesome to see the Trossen Robotics Community take a creative opportunity and give some feedback on this project. User lewisRRL states:

Hi guys,

Just wanted to make you all aware of a new project, and gather your ideas.
The project is called Real Robots Live and will make it possible to log onto a live robot over the internet and drive it around a remote arena.
You’ll have full control over the robot via the software and will be able to see the camera images that stream from the robot’s perspective. It’s a high res, low latency feed on the robots and around the arena.
Lots of these robots will be playing in the same arena – a real life online multiplayer game!
We want robots to be able to construct structures, destroy them using weapons and interact with the arena (opening doors,etc.).
Once online, we want to setup RealRobotsLiveTV so everyone can watch live events.

This is a call for ideas. This is a game with the real world as it’s engine. What would you like to see in this?

In 2-3 months we are aiming to crowdfund the project.

Cheers,
Lewis

If you’d like to put your two cents in the hat, join the discussion!

Samsung ARTIK Alpha Developer Portal is Open!

May 15th, 2015

Samsung ARTIK

Samsung ARTIK is a series of Arduino compatible boards, similar to Intel Edison in its stated goals, but with an end-to-end support system that should keep your projects rolling through the learning curve. There are 3 boards, all of them with tiny footprints, low power consumption, and features aplenty. If you’re interested in getting onboard early, consider applying for their Alpha Developer Program. Application deadline is May 31st.

C.H.I.P. Looks Promising!

May 13th, 2015

Rhoeby

Trossen Robotics is backing CHIP – The World’s First Nine Dollar Computer, for its potential to increase the accessibility of smart, powerful robotics projects to students and roboticists of all ages and levels of expertise. This kickstarter broke a million dollars in the first few days, with a goal of only 50k! The C.H.I.P. is a small form factor, single board computer, much like the Raspberry Pi. It is similarly featured, but diverges in a few important aspects. It has onboard storage of 4GB, built-in WiFi and Bluetooth communications, and a smaller footprint, afforded by the optional VGA and HDMI adapters. There are 23 days left to back this project, so strike while the iron is hot!

Oregon State University’s Bipedal Robot: ATRIAS

May 11th, 2015

Rhoeby

ATRIAS, built by the Oregon State University’s Dynamic Robotics Laboratory, directed by Dr. Jonathan Hurst, is an awesome bipedal robot. ATRIAS is capable of balancing itself on changing terrain, rolling hills, and even while being pelted by dodgeballs! This robot is clever, and we wish the team lots of luck at the DARPA Robotics Challenge in Pomona, CA on June 5-6, 2015.

HR-OS1 and RME

May 8th, 2015

Rhoeby

The HR-OS1 is alive and kicking. Well, more likely punching right now. We might have accidentally exposed him to Smash Brothers, and he might idolize Little Mac a bit. Using Robot Motion Editor to teach the HR-OS1 new moves is easy and fun! This is all early movement editing, without the use of sensors to correct for balance. It does take a little bit of time to get used to balancing the little fella, but as you can see from the video, the HR-OS1 is very capable of holding his own through a wide variety of movement. We get a kick out of watching him dance!

Chicago Northside Mini Maker Faire was Awesome!

May 6th, 2015

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We had a great time for the third year in a row at the Chicago Northside Mini Maker Faire! So many bright young stars came to our booth to learn about robotics, some of which were involved in arduino programming, many of which left with an interest in robotics. We rolled out the HR-OS1 for his first public event, and everyone loved him! Congrats to the volunteers on a successful Maker Faire, and many more to come!

 

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ROS enabled PhantomX Hexapod

May 4th, 2015

phantomx hex w kevino ros

User r3n33 has deployed KevinO’s ROS development onto a PhantomX Hexapod with a Raspberry Pi 2! This is an involved process, and it is awesome to see an already solid ROS package get some well deserved attention. It’s awesome seeing what happens when the robotics community comes together to focus on something spectacular.

RTEAM’s new Mech Warfare Robots!

May 1st, 2015

rteam

RTEAM Robotics Club from Tuscon, Arizona has been expanding their army of Mech Warfare combatants! Currently, they are testing out the use of Piezoelectric Speaker Scoring Panels instead of the FSR panels that have become a standard lately. This came about due to the expansion in number of mechs, and a lack of materials for half of them. User giantflaw offered some insight as to the continued use of Piezoelectric Speaker Scoring Panels:

RTEAM piezoelectric target plates are fully compatible with the existing target plate system and I think offer 6 advantages over the FSR plates. 1.) They are much more sensitive than the FSRs 2.) They register target plate hits reliably every time and never resgister any robot vibration or shock to the robot. The target plates are oblivious to walking gait. 3.) They are much cheaper than FSR target plates and easliy made with analog components. 4.) They can be de-tuned to be less sensitive and mimic an FSR low sensitivity target plate. 5.) There are no dead zones in the target panel like there are on FSR target panels. 6.) The target panel can be any shape or size unlike the FSR target panels. 7.) The target panels are tougher than the FSR plates and are not easily damaged.

If you’d like to see what the buzz is all about, hop in on this thread!