Archive for the ‘Featured Projects / Robots’ Category

Boston Dynamics never ceases to amaze

Friday, June 24th, 2016

spotMini
The Team at Boston Dynamics has come out with a new robot in their line of quadrupeds named SpotMini!

SpotMini is a new smaller version of the Spot robot, weighing 55 lbs dripping wet (65 lbs if you include its arm.) SpotMini is all-electric (no hydraulics) and runs for about 90 minutes on a charge, depending on what it is doing. SpotMini is one of the quietest robots we have ever built. It has a variety of sensors, including depth cameras, a solid state gyro (IMU) and proprioception sensors in the limbs. These sensors help with navigation and mobile manipulation. SpotMini performs some tasks autonomously, but often uses a human for high-level guidance.

This little guy is adorable to watch, and truly a work of ingenuity. Some people find it creepy, but it certainly isn’t as terrifying as Thomas the War Engine, so I think we’re safe.

Spider Pig, the autonomous Hexapod!

Monday, June 6th, 2016

spiderPig
Instructables user and student at Linkoping University, FredrikG3 has made an incredibly clever autonomous hexapod named Spider Pig! Using the Trossen Robotics AX Hexapod as a base, Fredrik has added an array of sensors, a raspberry pi, and well conceived code to allow the hexapod to navigate high and low terrain while making its way through a series of corridors! Check out the video and learn more on the spider pig instructables page!

Chicago Northside Mini Maker Faire was epic!

Thursday, May 26th, 2016

Geekbot Challenge
We had a great time at the Chicago Northside Mini Maker Faire! As usual we brought the PhantomX Hexapod MK-III on a leash (always a crowd favorite), but everyone fell in love with the Geekbot V2 this year! We were there all day running an arena with kids piloting Geekbots to take as many balls as they could to the goal. We set up wireless first person view cameras on the Geekbots and control stations that utilized a combination of Wii Classic Controllers and Xbees at our booth, giving an awesome experience to anyone willing to step up to the challenge. With no prior experience with robotics, children were taking control of the arena with ease, and people came to watch, play, and learn about robotics all day! Seeing how the children interacted with the robots was heartwarming, to say the least. Check out the video that Kyle put together, and feel a little of what we felt that day!

makerFaire2016 from kamon mark on Vimeo.

Snapper arm on a Create 2 Base – Bricklayers Robot

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

snapperRoomba
Carl H made this robot for his final in Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s RBE 501 class, and color us impressed! Using the iRobot Create2 as a base and a Snapper Arm to do the lifting, Carl has put together a robot that can build a wall, brick by brick. Since there was a limited window of time for completion of this project, there is still tuning necessary before this thing goes fully autonomous, but it’s super cool, and shows off the versatility of RobotGeek Parts! If you want to add a Snapper to your Create 2, check out the code on GitHub!

GummiArm keeps getting better

Monday, April 25th, 2016

laser distance with phone
We’ve covered the GummiArm before, but it’s an ongoing project, and it just keeps getting better! This time we have a video of the GummiArm taking a hit from a full 2 liter bottle and living to tell the tale! This is quite a feat, and well executed. As before, the project files are available here if you’re interested in building one for yourself.

Have you seen RobotGeek Instructables lately?

Monday, April 11th, 2016

We’re rolling out a RobotGeek Project / Guide on Instructables once a week! Check out our Profile to see what we’re up to now!

Full size BB-8 Build!

Friday, February 5th, 2016

full size bb8
Star Wars fans, you’ve got to check this out. Instructable user ASCAS (Angelo) has made a full-size, app controlled BB-8 Droid. That in and of itself is cool, but Angelo has been kind enough to make an instructable so that you can build one too! This has gotten some discussion going around the office as to how we’re likely to make one. This is just awesome, and here’s to hoping this inspires many people to get involved with robotics!

HR-OS1 with Jasper Installed

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

Jasper Installed

Youtube User panthallion has installed Jasper on his HR-OS1 (with Raspberry Pi), and it’s pretty cool. The age of robotic personal assistance is upon us. Jasper is an open source platform for developing voice-controlled applications, similar to Siri, OK Google, Cortana, and so on. In this case, Jasper is being used in conjunction with an HR-OS1 to make a robot that can assist you with daily tasks, answer questions, tell a joke, and generally be responsive and helpful when given a voice command. It’s interesting to see the HR-OS1 physically reacting to the content it is delivering (it genuinely seems frustrated with one of the questions asked of it). Very clever!

New Instructable – Auto Turret with Pixy and Nerf Gun

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

Autoturret with pixy and nerf gun
We have a new project that we’re excited for you to try! With the Auto-Turret Project, you can automatically track down and fire upon your enemies! This project utilizes a Pixy camera module, a RobotGeek pan/tilt base, a foam dart gun, and a Geekduino to coordinate the components. The Pixy can be ‘taught’ to recognize different colors, and when it ‘sees’ an object with the matched color, it will send data to the Geekduino. The Geekduino will then move the pan and tilt servos so that the object is in the center of the Pixy’s field of view. If the object stays still for too long, the foam dart gun will engage, firing a dart at the object!

You can find the Instructable here, or go to the RobotGeek Learning site here for the same instruction.

HR-OS1 Tackles the Stairs!

Thursday, December 17th, 2015

Taking the Stairs
Qian Wang, a student working in a group of researchers from the Institute of Media Innovation at Nanyang Technological University has done an excellent job making a set of motions that allows the HR-OS1 to climb up stairs! Keeping in mind the weight balance of each part, the movement looks both careful and acrobatic.

One of the major challenges, and often the first question we hear when discussing bipedal robots is, “Can it take the stairs?” and thanks to the efforts of Qian Wang, the answer is a resounding yes!

This was shared with us by Shihui Guo on the Trossen Robotics Forums, and there is an active discussion about how to improve this movement. They were kind enough to share the motion files, which can easily be added to your HR-OS1’s RME list with r3n33’s WinRME. Try it out, join the discussion, and get creative!