Stabilisation And Association Agreements

Stabilization and association agreements are part of the EU Stabilisation and Association Process (PSA) and the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). At present, the countries of the Western Balkans are at the heart of the PSA. Specific Stabilization and Association Agreements (ASAs) have been implemented with various Balkan countries, which contain explicit provisions for the country`s future accession to the EU. The SAAs resemble in principle the European agreements signed in the 1990s with the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the association agreement with Turkey. For any technical questions regarding this article or the correction of its authors, titles, summaries, bibliographies or download information, please contact: (Peter Golla). General supplier contact information: www.sciendo.com/services/journals . If you have written this article and are not yet registered with RePEc, we advise you to do so here. This way, you can link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept possible quotes on this article of which we are not sure. In 2005, the EU`s relations with the Western Balkans were transferred from “external relations” to the “enlargement” political segment. From 2015, Albania, Northern Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia will be officially recognised as candidates for membership.

Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo are not recognized as candidate countries, but as potential candidates. [1] ASAs are based mainly on the EU`s EU acquis and are based on their enactment in the legislation of cooperating states. The political harmonisation expected by the ASA is lower than for EU Member States; Some areas of action of the Community acquis may not fall under a specific ASA. The agreement with Kosovo was the first to be signed after the Lisbon Treaty came into force, which brought down the EU`s legal personality. [2] [3] An EU representative in Kosovo stated that “unlike the ASA with other countries in the region, this agreement will be exclusively the EU agreement. The EU will sign them as a legal entity. [4] The agreement did not have to be ratified individually by each Member State, some of which did not recognize Kosovo`s independence. [5] The representative added: “Since Kosovo is not recognised by the five Member States, we had to adopt a directive stating that the signing of the agreement will not mean that the EU or any of the countries will recognise Kosovo as a state.” [4] All the content of this site has been made available by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. If you request a correction, please include the word in this article: RePEc:vrs:cinrer:v:24:y:2018:i:81:p:51-68:n:3.

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