Hagetaka: A Bipedal Combat Robot

Remember when we teased you with a stack of RX-64 servos? Well its time to unveil a bit more of what we’re working on for the upcoming Mech Warfare competition at Robogames 2009. Meet Hagetaka; a 7DOF per leg biped built around the powerful RX-64 servo from Robotis. This robot boasts 14 RX-64s, 2 RX-28s, a custom aluminum chassis machined by sponsor Big Blue Saw, an onboard linux based Gumstix computer with a PS3 Sixaxis controller , a WiFi video server using a Headplay Personal Cinema System for remote piloting, and of course dual automatic airsoft guns. Video and more info will be available in the near future, and be sure to check out the June issue of SERVO magazine for the first in a series of articles detailing the build process of this Mech.

Click for larger image.

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7 Responses to “Hagetaka: A Bipedal Combat Robot”

  1. [...] was working on my mech Hagetaka the other night and made the mistake of grabbing at the robot to stabilize it, and managed to graze [...]

  2. [...] was working on my mech Hagetaka the other night and made the mistake of grabbing at the robot to stabilize it while it was moving, [...]

  3. [...] Andrew Alter of Trossen Robotics says: I was working on my mech Hagetaka [a bipedal combat robot] the other night and made the mistake of grabbing at the robot to stabilize [...]

  4. (here via Boingboing)
    You has GOTS to put a small GI Joe or some such in the cockpit.

    That is some sweet electromechanical work!

  5. rob says:

    Wow that is cool, you could probably sell kits for that, it would be cool to have one.

    How much has the build set you back so far?

  6. Andrew says:

    Rob-

    Total retail parts cost is a bit over $10,000 USD… but that’s not factoring in the hundreds of hours I’ve dropped into it over the past 6 months.

  7. diego says:

    Andrew
    Nice toy!
    I am also working on a robot using gumstix cpu board and RX-64 servos. Can I ask what interface you use between gumstix and rs485? It seems to me that a USB to rs232/rs485 converter would add some serious delays. The TI ARM chip does have a couple of UARTS but they don’t seem to be designed for auto rs485 flow control. The only options I see are:
    1) to hack the uart driver to control RTS pin in real-time but driver coding is still a little above my head…
    2) use SPI-rs485 converter chip but that is more hardware hacking than i’d like to get into.

    Any suggestions/comments would be greatly appreciated.

    D.

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